Sustainable WNC

The Gateway to Sustainability in Western North Carolina

Archive for January, 2008

Turning Prayer into Action: Coming this Monday evening – January 28, 2008!

Saturday, January 26th, 2008

Dear Relatives,

Coming this Monday evening – January 28, 2008!

Turning Prayer into Action

A one hour program that brings together the International Council of 13 Indigenous Grandmothers in Dharamsala, India, with the Bioneers Conference in Northern California for a live dialogue

www.linktv.org/programs/turning

Category: Documentaries

Regions: South Asia ,

North America

Topics: Indigenous Peoples ,

Religion / Spirituality

In Honor of the Grandmothers!

For conservation and sustainability,

Paul

Paul Gallimore, Director
Long Branch Environmental Education Center
POB 369 Big Sandy Mush Creek
Leicester, NC 28748
Tel. 828/683-3662 Fax: 828/683-9211
E-mail: paul@LongBranchEEC.org
Web Site: www.LongBranchEEC.org
www.paul.sustainablewnc.org

“To restore the land one must live and work in a place.
To work in a place is to work with others.
People who work together in a place become a community,
and a community, in time, grows a culture.
To work on behalf of the wild is to restore culture.”
– Gary Snyder

“…we must choose in this crucial moment of human history….”

Monday, January 21st, 2008

Dear Relatives,

Today is a good day to remember.

Here’s an excerpt from Dr. Martin Luther King’s speech delivered April 4, 1967 at a meeting of Clergy and Laity Concerned at Riverside Church in New York City:

Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence

… A genuine revolution of values means in the final analysis that our loyalties must become ecumenical rather than sectional. Every nation must now develop an overriding loyalty to mankind as a whole in order to preserve the best in their individual societies.

This call for a world-wide fellowship that lifts neighborly concern beyond one’s tribe, race, class and nation is in reality a call for an all-embracing and unconditional love for all men. This oft misunderstood and misinterpreted concept — so readily dismissed by the Nietzsches of the world as a weak and cowardly force — has now become an absolute necessity for the survival of man. When I speak of love I am not speaking of some sentimental and weak response. I am speaking of that force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life. Love is somehow the key that unlocks the door which leads to ultimate reality. This Hindu-Moslem-Christian-Jewish-Buddhist belief about ultimate reality is beautifully summed up in the first epistle of Saint John:

Let us love one another; for love is God and everyone that loveth is born of God and knoweth God. He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love. If we love one another God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfected in us.

Let us hope that this spirit will become the order of the day. We can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. The oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. History is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. As Arnold Toynbee says : “Love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. Therefore the first hope in our inventory must be the hope that love is going to have the last word.”

We are now faced with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history there is such a thing as being too late. Procrastination is still the thief of time. Life often leaves us standing bare, naked and dejected with a lost opportunity. The “tide in the affairs of men” does not remain at the flood; it ebbs. We may cry out desperately for time to pause in her passage, but time is deaf to every plea and rushes on. Over the bleached bones and jumbled residue of numerous civilizations are written the pathetic words: “Too late.” There is an invisible book of life that faithfully records our vigilance or our neglect. “The moving finger writes, and having writ moves on…” We still have a choice today; nonviolent coexistence or violent co-annihilation.

We must move past indecision to action. We must find new ways to speak for peace in Vietnam and justice throughout the developing world — a world that borders on our doors. If we do not act we shall surely be dragged down the long dark and shameful corridors of time reserved for those who possess power without compassion, might without morality, and strength without sight.

Now let us begin. Now let us rededicate ourselves to the long and bitter — but beautiful — struggle for a new world. This is the calling of the sons of God, and our brothers wait eagerly for our response. Shall we say the odds are too great? Shall we tell them the struggle is too hard? Will our message be that the forces of American life militate against their arrival as full men, and we send our deepest regrets? Or will there be another message, of longing, of hope, of solidarity with their yearnings, of commitment to their cause, whatever the cost? The choice is ours, and though we might prefer it otherwise we must choose in this crucial moment of human history….

www.ssc.msu.edu/~sw/mlk/brkslnc.htm

For conservation and sustainability,


Paul Gallimore, Director
Long Branch Environmental Education Center
POB 369 Big Sandy Mush Creek
Leicester, NC 28748
Tel. 828/683-3662 Fax: 828/683-9211
E-mail: paul@LongBranchEEC.org
Web Site: www.LongBranchEEC.org
www.paul.sustainablewnc.org

“To restore the land one must live and work in a place.
To work in a place is to work with others.
People who work together in a place become a community,
and a community, in time, grows a culture.
To work on behalf of the wild is to restore culture.”
– Gary Snyder

Indigenous Elders’ Call

Tuesday, January 1st, 2008

Dear Relatives,

I received this Indigenous Elders’ Call awhile back from Grandmother Sara Smith, Mohawk Nation, Turtle Clan, from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory, Ontario Canada.
I told her that I realized she was pretty tricky!
Because when it came 12 Noon on January 1, I realized that there was no reason to stop praying for peace and healing!
And as Ted Williams, Tuscarora Elder, would say,
“This prayer goes on forever.”

Blessings for the New Year,
Paul

INDIGENOUS ELDERS’ CALL:

This is a call for Global Four Directions Prayer for Peace, a 24 hour effort to end the war and global violence. We are asking all the leaders and peacemakers to join us in this effort.

The start date will be 12 noon, December 31, starting in the Eastern time zones, and continuing through January 1.

On September 11, 2001, as a result of the tragedy, we were all one people and it is time for us to come back together with one heart, one mind, one prayer, one intention to create a more peaceful world for the generations to come and all our relations.

This activation comes as a request from some of the Four Directions Elders and Medicine People as communicated to Grace Smith Yellow Hammer.

We are requesting spiritual leaders all over the globe to call their people together in their sacred spaces so that all people, all colors, all directions are included in this effort.

With all the devastation of war and escalation of terror and environmental harm on the planet, it is obvious why we need to come together at this time.

For those of you who will understand this, there was recently a quarter moon in the morning with two stars within the crescent. This along with the recent Venus alignment, is a potent call for an activation because it signifies both danger and opportunity.

We hope you will be inspired to join us in this call. We are simply asking all people of all races, all faiths, all traditions to pray for peace and healing in whatever way is appropriate during this time and to remember that as we link with one heart, one mind, one intention we can heal the world one step at a time.

May peace prevail on Earth,

Sincerely,

Grace Smith Yellow Hammer , Dineh [Navajo]
yhammer@cybertrails.com

Grandfather William Commanda, Annishinabe [Ojibway]
Keeper of the Seven Fires Prophecies Belt
www.circleofallnations.com

Grandfather Martin Gasheseoma
Traditional Hopi Elder

Chief Arvol Looking horse {Lakota]
www.wolakota.org

Venerable Bardor Tulku Rinpoche [Tibetan Buddhist]
Karma Triyana Dharmachakra
www.kagyu.org

Roberto Borrero, United Confederation of Taino People
mayohuacan@yahoo.com

Grandmother Sara Smith
Six Nations of the Grand River, Mohawk Nation, Turtle Clan
Six Nations of the Grand River Territory, Ontario Canada
nyaweh@sympatico.ca

Grandfather Henry Niese
Eagle Voice Center , North Carolina

Chief Tom Dostou, Waban-aki ( Eastern- Land)Aylnu, Bear Clan, Midewin
tmpdostou@yahoo.com

Reverend Dr Dave Randle, Executive Director, The Whale
Center
whale@globalhealing.net

World Peace Prayer Society
www.worldpeace.org

Erma Pounds
Director, Arizona Karma Thegsum Choling (KTC) [Buddhist]

Reverend Charles Gibbs
United Religions Initiative
www.uri.org

Reverend Ilfra Halley
Center for the Living Earth
ilfra@wamc.org

Reverend Betsy Stang, Executive Director
The Wittenberg Center for Alternative Resources Inc
www.wittenbergcenter.com
bebird@aol.com

Elizabeth Stinson, Director Peace & Justice Center of Sonoma
County
Santa Rosa, California
www.peaceandjusticesonomaco.org/

For conservation and sustainability,


Paul Gallimore, Director
Long Branch Environmental Education Center
POB 369 Big Sandy Mush Creek
Leicester, NC 28748
Tel. 828/683-3662 Fax: 828/683-9211
E-mail: paul@LongBranchEEC.org
Web Site: www.LongBranchEEC.org
www.paul.sustainablewnc.org

“To restore the land one must live and work in a place.
To work in a place is to work with others.
People who work together in a place become a community,
and a community, in time, grows a culture.
To work on behalf of the wild is to restore culture.”
– Gary Snyder